Missouri Drone Workshop covers broad topics: FAA Part 107, cinematography & flight

Missouri Drone Journalism hosted a day-long workshop on the campus of the University of Missouri that attracted more than 45 participants, including students, television news photojournalists, visiting faculty and realtors.  The program covered the FAA’s new Part 107 regulations, reviewed the necessary study topics for the Remote Pilot exam, demonstrated classic cinema techniques and three hours of flight training during the afternoon on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016.

 

 

 

Workshop Provides Safety Education for Unmanned Aircraft Operators

Rick Shaw attended an intensive symposium workshop on drone flight safety at the Unmanned Safety Institute in Orlando, Florida in June 2015.  Read his reflections on the importance of drone safety training.  The Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute sponsored his tuition for the specialized training that earned him UAS Safety Certification and UAS Instructor Certification for small unmanned aircraft from the Unmanned Safety Institute, which is affiliated with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

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Costa Rica Trip

The first addition to our Projects page:

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Since government regulations prevent us from doing drone journalism in U.S. airspace, we look for opportunities internationally. To date, our favorite spot to fly is Costa Rica, particularly in the northwestern province of Guanacaste. Below you’ll see some of our recent work there.

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Field Reporting Flight School 101

 

Welcome to Drones in Journalism

Welcome to the official blog for the University of Missouri Drone Journalism project. This project is a collaboration between the Missouri School of Journalism, the University of Missouri Information Technology Program and NPR member station KBIA. This semester students enrolled in a science investigative reporting course are working with UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), or drones, to create engaging, innovative, responsible public-service journalism stories. This project is being funded by a $25,000 grant from the MU Interdisciplinary Innovations Fund to explore the use of drones in journalism.

A picture of a drone

A close up of a drone prototype. Photo by Jaime Cooke

 

Drones tend to have a negative connotation in today’s media. The public mostly hears the word drone when associated with war and destruction. However, drone technology can be used in many other aspects, including field reporting. Part of this project’s goal is to discover how best to utilize this technology in the field of journalism.